'Earth's Cousin': Scientists Find Alien Planet That's Most Like Home
By Alan Boyle, nbcnews.com
An artist’s con­cept depicts Kepler-186f, the first val­i­dat­ed Earth-size plan­et to orbit a dis­tant star in the hab­it­able zone. The hab­it­able zone defines a range of dis­tances from a star where liq­uid water could exist on a plan­et’s…

Here’s your other Earth ;)

'Earth's Cousin': Scientists Find Alien Planet That's Most Like Home
By Alan Boyle, nbcnews.com

An artist’s con­cept depicts Kepler-186f, the first val­i­dat­ed Earth-size plan­et to orbit a dis­tant star in the hab­it­able zone. The hab­it­able zone defines a range of dis­tances from a star where liq­uid water could exist on a plan­et’s…

Here’s your other Earth ;)

(Source: el0h3em)

"As it currently exists, mainstream U.S. education favors a one-size-fits-all model of education that marginalizes students who have different learning styles, abilities, backgrounds, and needs. The U.S. education system lacks culturally relevant approaches that meet students at their level and provide learning environments where students can be continuously engaged and appropriately challenged. Often, poor, Black students, with disabilities who are not able to succeed within this model are ostracized. When we only value one type of intellectual academic achievement and link that specific achievement with superiority, those who do not excel in those same ways may experience classroom marginalization and act out with very appropriate anger. Further, institutions must introduce anti-ableist curriculum to the classroom so that students with disabilities can have an accessible, safe, fully integrated classroom experience."

socialismartnature:




This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

socialismartnature:

This sculpture by Issac Cordal in Berlin is called “Politicians discussing global warming.”

(via notyerbro)

haroldlewis said: im sorry that im ignorant in this matter but isn't hispanic/latin@ a racial identity? or?

fileformat:

owning-my-truth:

There are Asian Latin@s

image

[image description: Picture of former Peruvian president Alberto Fujimori with members of his armed forces. He is Japanese-Peruvian]

Afro/Black Latin@s

image

[image description: Picture of Zoe Saldana, who is an Afro-Latina from the Dominican Republic]

Indigenous Latin@s

image

[image description: Picture of Evo Morales, the president of Bolivia who is ehtnically mestizo but primarily of Aymara descent and identifies with that indigenous nation]

Mixed Latin@s

image

[image description: Picture of Adriana Lima, who is a Brazilian woman of mixed African, Swiss, Portuguese, Indigenous and Japanese descent]

White Latin@s

image

[image description: Picture of Michelle Bachelet, the former president of Chile]

And more.

Latin@ is NOT a race, it is an ethnicity that includes people of ALL races.

shoutout

midnightbittersweet:

kevin0793:

acceptingamerican:


A 50- something year old white woman arrived at her seat on a crowded flight and immediately didn’t want the seat. The seat was next to a black man. Disgusted, the woman immediately summoned the flight attendant and demanded a new seat. The woman said “I cannot sit here next to this black man.” The fight attendant said “Let me see if I can find another seat.” After checking, the flight attendant returned and stated “Ma’am, there are no more seats in economy, but I will check with the captain and see if there is something in first class.” About 10 minutes went by and the flight attendant returned and stated “The captain has confirmed that there are no more seats in economy, but there is one in first class. It is our company policy to never move a person from economy to first class, but being that it would be some sort of scandal to force a person to sit next to such a disgusting, unpleasant person, the captain has agreed to allow the switch to first class.” Before the woman could say anything, the attendant turned to the black man and said, “Therefore sir, if you would please retrieve your personal items, we would like to move you to the comfort of first class, as the captain would hate for you to have to sit next to such a disgusting person.”
Passengers in the seats nearby began to applause while some gave a standing ovation.

Forever reblog

My faith in human decency is restored

the human raise just might have hope

midnightbittersweet:

kevin0793:

acceptingamerican:

A 50- something year old white woman arrived at her seat on a crowded flight and immediately didn’t want the seat. The seat was next to a black man. Disgusted, the woman immediately summoned the flight attendant and demanded a new seat. The woman said “I cannot sit here next to this black man.” The fight attendant said “Let me see if I can find another seat.” After checking, the flight attendant returned and stated “Ma’am, there are no more seats in economy, but I will check with the captain and see if there is something in first class.” About 10 minutes went by and the flight attendant returned and stated “The captain has confirmed that there are no more seats in economy, but there is one in first class. It is our company policy to never move a person from economy to first class, but being that it would be some sort of scandal to force a person to sit next to such a disgusting, unpleasant person, the captain has agreed to allow the switch to first class.” Before the woman could say anything, the attendant turned to the black man and said, “Therefore sir, if you would please retrieve your personal items, we would like to move you to the comfort of first class, as the captain would hate for you to have to sit next to such a disgusting person.”

Passengers in the seats nearby began to applause while some gave a standing ovation.

Forever reblog

My faith in human decency is restored

the human raise just might have hope

(Source: redhotsathya, via notyerbro)

"Schizophrenics are much less likely to recognize the sound of their own voice."

— (via psych-facts)

(Source: psych2go, via psych-facts)

diasporicroots:

Yasuke African Samurai of the Japanese Warlord Nobunaga Oda.

“Japan is not a place one would usually associate with immigrants from Africa or the Caribbean. Yet in the late 16th century Japan’s most powerful warlord, Oda Nobunaga, had a African page named Yasuke it is belived that Yasuke was either a Makua originally from Mozambique or from somewhere in the Congo region. Yasuke was not only a cultural curiosity but also served as Nobunaga’s bodyguard and was granted the prestigious rank of Samurai.

Yasuke arrived in Japan in 1579 as the servant of the Italian Jesuit Alessandro Valignano, who had been appointed the Visitor (inspector) of the Jesuit missions in the Indies, i.e. S. and E. Asia, an extremely high position, so Yasuke must have been quite trustworthy. He accompanied Valignano when the latter came to the capital area in March 1581 and caused something of a sensation. In one event, several people were crushed to death while clamouring to get a look at him. Nobunaga heard about him and expressed a desire to see him. Suspecting the black color of his skin to be paint, Nobunaga had him strip from the waist up and made him scrub his skin.

 We do not know this Yasuke’s original Makua name but the Japanese called him Yasuke (彌介), the reason for this name is unknown as it does not have a clear meaning and that it is most likely a “Japanization” of his actual name. 

He was apparently 6ft 2in and would have towered over the Japanese of the day. Nobunaga first heard of Yasuke when the news reached him in 1581 of the great crush that had occurred when Valignano had brought him to Kyoto where his skin colour and height attracted a huge crowd. Nobunaga ordered the Jesuit to bring Yasuke to his court so that he could see this sensation in the flesh.

Upon seeing Yasuke, Nobunaga allegedly ordered him stripped to the waist and scrubbed believing that his skin was painted.  Japanese sources described Yasuke as “looking between the age of 24 or 25, black like an ox, healthy and good looking, and possessing the strength of 10 men. Nobunaga was further intrigued by the fact that Yasuke could speak Japanese (albeit not perfectly) and ordered Valignano to leave Yasuke in his care when the Jesuit prepared to leave again.

Yasuke became a permanent fixture in Nobunaga’s retinue, his size and strength acting as a deterrent to assassination not to mention a flavour of exoticism to accompany the warlord’s other Western possessions. Apparently Nobunaga became so fond of Yasuke that rumours abounded that the slave was going to be made a Daimyo (a Japanese land-owning lord). These rumours were proven wrong, however, Yasuke was given the honour of being made a member of the samurai class, a rare honour among foreigners. “ 

Read more here. 

You can read more about Yasuke here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yasuke

Important note: Obviously this is not a 16th century photo because there weren’t any cameras back then. The people in this photo were just stage actors who posed for this shot.

WTH is “Africa Skin”? and Why is it bad?

chocolateandwater:

I’m wearing my hair big today! Bold! Beautiful??? When the students caught sight of my wild do, some of them laughed and called me "Ajjuma perma"—kids can be so mean :0) I just roll with the punches. Most of the students said that my hair was pretty; a few students said it was ugly-one in particular, rather brazenly! Here is where things get…umm…I’ll just tell the story.

The student that called my hair ugly was told to shut up by a few other girls. They said, “Kelly teacher don’t listen to her. She has Africa skin.” I said, what does Africa skin mean? They said, “B-l-a-c-k!” and another student chimed in “B-R-O-W-N-!” And they all laughed.

Now mind you, Koreans come in a variety of shades. Some are white as milk, while others, are as brown as a crayola crayon in an eight box. And I’ve seen a lot more BROWN SKIN Koreans than I have white ones. This particular student (the one that was being chastised for chastising me) is darker than I am, so I said to the students, but I am brown too. And so are you. I pointed to the lighter students who weren’t exactly white but still managed to have more than a hint of color in their skin. I said, but you are brown and so are you. A few of the students recoiled at the thought of being brown. “No teacher I am white!” “My skin is white.” I said-No, your skin is brown. I pulled up an image a few white women on the computer and I said, their skin is white. Your skin is brown and it it beautiful.

They all just laughed. Either because they didn’t understand me or because the thought of brown skin being beautiful was the funniest thing they could imagine.

I always try to take these moments and turn them into a lesson but sometimes I think what’s the point? This light skin dark skin thing has been ingrained into their society for ages! And it is inculcated on their young minds at an early age.

It is not just with girls but with the boys as well. In the text book, it is always the black kid that has his face scribbled on, eyes punched out, or horns attached to his head. Earlier today I was watching a children’s video with one of my students. In the middle of the stage there was a black man singing. My student pointed at the screen and said, “Teacher! Ugly!” BUT I COULDN’T even SEE the GUY’S FACE to make a ruling! Either that kid had the sharpest hawk eye vision or I am just getting old because all I could see was that the man was black. He was to small on the screen to actually make out his features. So I asked the student, why is he ugly? The student just walked away shaking his head and repeating ugly. But I knew the answer, the student didn’t have to see the man’s facial features to be convinced, his brown skin was enough.

Does anyone else encounter this while teaching? What do you do? How do you approach it? Do you ignore it, or turn it into a lesson to fight against,—what is this called— racism, prejudice, or ignorance? 

Anyhow I’d love to hear from you. 

Anonymous said: I respect other perspectives but I really think lots of discussions of antiblack racism with Asian communities focuses on a black american/asian american context. Black Americans are still fucking American and benefit from the imperialistic structure that places them at the top of the hierarchy. There are institutions (IMF?) that enforce free market capitalism on nations, which predominantly benefits America. Why should we forgive that? I don't doubt they've problems, but the West has hurt

wocinsolidarity:

voguedissent:

blackinasia:

As a black American who taught abroad, I will have to call the entire AAGU team on this complete and utter bullshit.

(TW: rape)

Like have we not been over this before? I deservedly got called on this exact same shit months ago because YES, WESTERN PRIVILEGE ABROAD IS A REAL THING EVEN IF YOU ARE A POC!

Why else would I have met Africans (from Africa) in China who I know try to “pass” as African-American so that they can have access to better treatment there? Oh, I don’t know maybe it’s because of our Western privilege?!?!?

African-Americans (and African immigrants to the West) get treated better than Africans (from Africa) abroad, why? WESTERN PRIVILEGE.

African-Americans and other POC from the West have access to many privileges when abroad that local peoples do not have, why? WESTERN PRIVILEGE.

African-Americans and other POC from the West even with the horrible antiblackness and other forms of oppression we may face abroad STILL get treated MUCH better than local minority groups, why? WESTERN PRIVILEGE. 

How is it that the African-Americans and other POC from the West  who  make it abroad (and this includes those part of our imperialist military industrial complex) can even visit these countries period while the vast majority of the local people do not have a reciprocal opportunity to do the same? WESTERN PRIVILEGE

How is it that African-Americans and other POC from the West in the military can, like their white counterparts, rape local women, help bulldoze communities, etc. and in many cases get away with it? WESTERN PRIVILEGE

Jesus FUCKING Christ. 

Bullshit like Jannat’s response are exactly why this is the FIRST tip on my “Guide on how to (try and ) not be a horrible Westerner abroad”:

  1. Acknowledge and be cognizant of your privilege from the start. If you are a Westerner, you have privileges and power accordingly due to Western hegemony,and this is also the case even if you are a POC from said countries that may be experiencing other forms of discrimination (e.g. antiblackness) there.

Western privilege and white privilege are not the same thing, although they reinforce one another in non-Western settings when white people go abroad. 

Does the AAGU team have no understanding of history, global power structures and (non US centric) context? This entire post is utterly shameful and a travesty. Just because you are oppressed in your local geography doesn’t mean that you can’t benefit from the imperialistic power structures which have elevated the status of your home country all across the globe when you go abroad (which is a privilege in and of itself). Imperialism does not have a “blind spot” for Western POC and implying as much spits in the face of history and tramples on the lived experiences of oppression of non-Western POC. 

You all owe your readers an apology. 

^^^ this. i think this also illustrates the problem of when ppl have limited praxis and don’t understand that context matters

american imperialism, in america, does not recognize black bodies as part of its empire. that does not, however, mean that black people still don’t benefit from it. and abroad, the fact that black bodies are excluded from the decision-making processes of american imperialism doesn’t necessarily get translated/conveyed. 

like i keep saying, one of the most difficult conversations to have is how we benefit from not only the oppression of others, but our oppression. white supremacy and imperialism wouldn’t keep going without us poc buying into it. it’s like what junot díaz said: 

If men had to run the patriarchy, they wouldn’t fucking do it. They’d have to take a pay cut. Men foist most of the energy of running patriarchy on women. […] And it’s the same thing with race, white supremacy would not fucking operate without people of color to run it. It’s not that white people don’t contribute to it. They do. But it couldn’t continue to exist without people of color. White supremacy is inside all of us. And that’s why it’s so malign and difficult to confront. 

I was looking at the baseball, the football players and their girlfriends and wives. And it’s like a white supremacist’s fucking dream. Because all of those players are with whiter, lighter women. And if you don’t think this has to do with the sexual economy of race and the racial economy of desire, you’re kidding yourself.

and

angryasiangirlsunited:

i completely disagree with this. due to the way antiblackness works just in the united states, actually for the most part black americans DON’T benefit from the imperialistic structure. what do you even consider someone benefiting from the structure? due to the voting rights act hoopla with the supreme court earlier this year, many black americans can’t even vote for the people who make the imperialist decisions. furthermore, you have ridiculously high incarceration rates, continuing felony disenfranchisement, racial profiling, and the violence that’s still perpetrated on black american bodies every single day not only by police but also everyday people (see: trayvon martin, renisha mcbride).

on top of that, you have antiblackness in virtually all communities, including asian communities, latin@ communities, etc. this is something that isn’t just limited to the united states. so really in any meaningful sense, no, black americans don’t benefit from the imperialist structure, and to blame them for such a structure in the context of anti-imperialist efforts is misguided at best but really quite antiblack at worst.

-jannat

The reality is even if we took every white person on Earth and put them on a space ship and sent them to outer space white supremacy wouldn’t miss a beat.

the anon’s question is still problematic. it doesn’t help anyone to see things in a hierarchy where one group is screwed over more than the next. how each of us gets screwed over is a little different from the next, and how one gets screwed over is connected to how the next gets screwed over. when we rank things, we reproduce the very capitalistic and imperialistic ideas that screwed us over to begin with.

if we don’t decenter from whiteness, we end up catering to it. not everything is about white ppl.  

^^^^^ THIS COMMENTARY RIGHT HERE

image

mehreenkasana:


Kartar Dhillon (India)
Kar was an activist and writer, involved with India’s freedom struggle, and later supporting organizations like the Black Panthers and helping organize farm workers in California. She passed away on June 15, 2008.
Ananda Coomaraswamy (Sri Lanka)
Born in Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) to a Tamil legislator and an English mother, Ananda Coomaraswamy was an important art historian, who is often credited as one of the first critics to introduce South Asian visual art to the United States.
Bhagat Singh Thind (India)
Bhagat Singh Thind is perhaps best known for his struggle for U.S. citizenship and the 1923 Supreme Court decision in United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind, which prevented South Asians from attaining American citizenship and redefined the parameters of race in America.
Anandabai Joshee (India)
While it’s true that the majority of early South Asian immigrants to the U.S. were men, there were a number of women who came to America from South Asia in the late 19th and early 20th century and made incredible contributions as trailblazers in the arts, sciences, medicine and politics. One such woman was Anandabai Joshee, born in 1865 in Pune.
Eqbal Ahmad (Pakistan)
Edward Said called him “the shrewdest and most original anti-imperialist analyst of Asia and Africa.” Throughout his life, Ahmad was at the center of key moments in anti-imperialist history. As a young man, he traveled to Algeria, joining the FLN (National Liberation Front) with Frantz Fanon. In the ’60s, Ahmad became a powerful voice in opposition to the Vietnam War and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East.
Learn more about them here.

While the list misses out on many philosophers, activists, writers from other parts of South Asia, here’s a helpful little list to start from. 

mehreenkasana:

Kartar Dhillon (India)

Kar was an activist and writer, involved with India’s freedom struggle, and later supporting organizations like the Black Panthers and helping organize farm workers in California. She passed away on June 15, 2008.

Ananda Coomaraswamy (Sri Lanka)

Born in Colombo, Ceylon (now Sri Lanka) to a Tamil legislator and an English mother, Ananda Coomaraswamy was an important art historian, who is often credited as one of the first critics to introduce South Asian visual art to the United States.

Bhagat Singh Thind (India)

Bhagat Singh Thind is perhaps best known for his struggle for U.S. citizenship and the 1923 Supreme Court decision in United States v. Bhagat Singh Thind, which prevented South Asians from attaining American citizenship and redefined the parameters of race in America.

Anandabai Joshee (India)

While it’s true that the majority of early South Asian immigrants to the U.S. were men, there were a number of women who came to America from South Asia in the late 19th and early 20th century and made incredible contributions as trailblazers in the arts, sciences, medicine and politics. One such woman was Anandabai Joshee, born in 1865 in Pune.

Eqbal Ahmad (Pakistan)

Edward Said called him “the shrewdest and most original anti-imperialist analyst of Asia and Africa.” Throughout his life, Ahmad was at the center of key moments in anti-imperialist history. As a young man, he traveled to Algeria, joining the FLN (National Liberation Front) with Frantz Fanon. In the ’60s, Ahmad became a powerful voice in opposition to the Vietnam War and U.S. foreign policy in the Middle East.

Learn more about them here.

While the list misses out on many philosophers, activists, writers from other parts of South Asia, here’s a helpful little list to start from. 

peaceshannon:

more from jane:

Of all the Korean War orphans who were adopted like Steven Morrison (MPAK - Mission to Promote Adoption in Korea), thousands and thousands were not adopted. Did you ever think about what really happened to them?

Yesterday I had a chat with a man who was orphaned in the…

did-you-kno:

Source

I freaking knew it!!!! 

did-you-kno:

Source

I freaking knew it!!!! 

malcolmxing:

Harlem 1963. Malcolm X rally. 

malcolmxing:

Harlem 1963. Malcolm X rally. 

(Source: donisdope, via fyeahcracker)